Gardening for pollinators

The bees and butterflies definitely prefer some plants in the garden over others. I am happy toIMG_20170907_141238312 see them in the yard. While I have some native plants, I have not specifically focused on pollinators. As I ponder how to revamp a couple perennial beds, I plan to incorporate more choices for these charming and useful little critters.

Gardening, whether vegetables or plants, has benefits as exercise. Structural Integration can help keep you in good condition to enjoy this activity!

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A how-to guide for change

Many of us have to deal with changes all the time, at work and at home. A friend recently recommended the book Switch by Chip Heath and Dan Heath. It’s about making changes when change is hard. away-2660117__340

Their premise is that there are 3 parts that have to align for a change to happen. Your rational mind, emotional mind, and environment all have to go in the same direction. This easy-to-read book provides background on the brain and psychology, inspiring examples, and a summary of their tips to overcome obstacles.

A few of the nuggets that I took away from this book:

  • People tend to look for a complicated solution to complex problems. It’s better to start with a simple, small action step. Early success builds motivation to keep working on the change.
  • When people are not changing, it’s often because they either need more clarity on what to do or the circumstances make doing the new thing hard.
  • Look for an existing success (bright spot) and use that as a model to build on.
  • You don’t have to understand the whole past history of how you got to this point. You can identify an action, however small, that moves you toward the goal and start doing it.

Another benefit of dietary fiber

Knee pain from osteoarthritis (OA) is a fairly common complaint. Cartilage damage can occur from a variety of factors including injuries, aging, and certain illnesses. Keeping the muscles around the knee strong and managing weight are two of the typical strategies to reduce pain.

A recent analysis of data from two large studies of patients with arthritis revealed another potential tool to help keep pain in check. Patients who ate more fiber had fewer  symptoms and less likelihood of knee pain becoming worse over time. This result is a correlation and not a definite cause and effect. However, I think it is another good reminder to eat well and get enough fiber in our diets.

From a Berkeley Wellness Newsletter Article, here are the numbers and this link is their List of Best Foods for Fiber.

People who consumed the most fiber—21 grams a day on average in the Osteoarthritis Initiative, and 26 grams in the Framingham study— had a 30 and 61 percent lower risk of OA symptoms, respectively, compared with people who ate the least. Higher fiber intake also reduced the likelihood of knee pain worsening among participants who had that symptom at the start of the studies.

 

 

More on Structural Integration

I learned my trade at the Guild for Structural Integration. I chose the Guild for several reasons. One reason was simply that it was where my practitioner had studied. Another was that the faculty included the first two teachers whom Ida Rolf chose to provide training on her method.

The Guild recently revamped its website. Updated sections on the “about us” tab include a summary of Dr. Rolf’s career. Here is a nugget from the page about the process of structural integration that I hope you will also find a useful reminder about the work we do together.

While Structural Integration is primarily concerned with physical changes in the body, it affects the whole person. We are made up of emotions, attitudes, belief systems and behavior patterns as well as the physical being. All are related. Align the physical structure and it will open up the individual’s potential.

The suboccipital muscles

Several recent clients have been surprised by how tender the muscles at the base of their skull felt when we workhead-982908__340ed there. I also noticed this part of my anatomy on the last few miles of a recent ride on my road bike. I started feeling my neck getting stiff.

The muscles in question are the suboccipitals. There are four of them and they connect your skull to the spine and are also connected to your eyes. They help tip your head toward your shoulder, among other actions. When the suboccipitals are tight, you could experience headaches, neck tightness, or even back pain.

Common posture habits can contribute to issues with the suboccipitals. Typical culprits are forward head posture or habitually tipping your chin up (to look through bifocals or at a computer monitor).

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Note how this rider’s head is tipped up to see the road.

To reduce tightness in the suboccipitals, some options to try include these easy things.

  • Pay attention to your posture (Rolf Line) – if your head is forward, bring it back into alignment.
  • Confirm that your computer monitor is at an ergonomic height. Usually, this means the top of the screen is at or below eye level.
  • Notice if you tend to tip your chin up and bring it back to level.
  • Make sure your glasses are properly adjusted.
  • Avoid holding your phone between your head and shoulder.

For more relief, you can also use 2 tennis balls in a sock to massage the base of your skull. For instructions and photos, refer to this post by Strength on Demand.

How do mind-body practices help you?

Do you meditate, practice yoga or tai chi, or do another mind-body practice? If so, you have probably noticed that these types of activities help reduce stress. Recent research from Coventry University has identified one way that such mindfulness practices help your body.

This study is from the Brain, Belief and Behaviour Lab in Coventry University’s Centre for Psychology, Behaviour and Achievement. Lead investigator Ivana Buric says,

These activities are leaving what we call a molecular signature in our cells, which reverses the effect that stress or anxiety would have on the body by changing how our genes are expressed. Put simply, [Mind-Body Interventions] cause the brain to steer our DNA processes along a path which improves our wellbeing.

People who practice a mindful activity experience changes in their bodies. These changes benefit health by decreasing the production of proteins that cause inflammation. Inflammation is useful in the short term to boost the immune system and fight infections. However, chronic inflammation is linked to a higher risk of some diseases and mental health conditions.

Are you ready to experience the physical and mental benefits of a mind-body practice for yourself? Community education, comofaith communities and online resources are all ways to access classes and videos to guide your efforts. You may want to try several options to find the activity that is right for you.

 

 

Be kind to yourself

Does your brain produce a lot of negative internal chatter? If so, it may be because the part of our brain that is the center for emotions, the amygdala, ulemons-2039830__340ses about two-thirds of its neurons to detect negative experiences or threats. This can result in our focusing more on the negative, even if we are experiencing as many – or more – positive things. This tendency is part of the human condition. While it still has usefulness in modern life, for many of us this system is over-active.

Our inner critic is looking for problems. However, we don’t need to listen to it. Being nicer to oucherries 2014 2nd pickingrselves is a good strategy to improve our well-being and reduce stress. We can learn how to do this even if it is not our natural tendency.

Dr. Kristin Neff, a researcher who specializes in self-compassion, says it has three parts:

  • Self-kindness: “Self-compassionate people recognize that being imperfect, failing, and experiencing life difficulties is inevitable, so they tend to be gentle with themselves when confronted with painful experiences rather than getting angry when life falls short of set ideals.”
  • Recognizing our experiences are part of the shared human experience
  • Being mindful or non-judgemental

Learn more tips, watch videos and find additional resources at Dr. Neff’s Self Compassion website.

Negativity also has an impact on the people around us. For tips on how to counter this in the workplace, see this blog post from Psychology Today: Are We Hardwired to be Positive or Negative?